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Kenya/Tanzania

For those short on time, there’s no need to sacrifice big fun or the opportunity to spot Africa’s ever-elusive ‘Big 5’ on this intense 10-day adventure. Experience the best of wild Africa and explore four famous game parks and reserves of Tanzania and Kenya, including the rolling hills of the Masai Mara and the savannah of the Serengeti. Small groups and safari vehicles not only allow for a more authentic travel experience, but ensure great views so that you’ll be able to capture the perfect shot of the some of the most amazing animals on the planet.


Itinerary

June 29 : Nairobi

Arrive at any time.

June 30 : Nakuru (B,L,D)

Game drive. Views of the Rift Valley from look-out points.

July 1 to July 2: Masai Mara Game Reserve (2B,2L,2D)

Daily game drives.

July 3 : Lake Victoria (B,L,D)

Cross border to Tanzania, camp on the shores of Lake Victoria.

July 4 to July 5: Serengeti National Park (2B,2L,2D)

Daily game drives. Option to take a boat or canoe ride on Lake Victoria, or do some fantastic bird watching.

July 6 : Olduvai Gorge/Ngorongoro Conservation Area (B,L,D)

Visit archaeological site of Olduvai Gorge. Camp at the rim of Ngorongoro Crater.

July 7 : Ngorongoro Crater/Arusha (B,L,D)

Game drive inside the Ngorongoro Crater. Dinner with the local community in Arusha.

July 8 : Arusha (B)

Depart at any time.

Detailed Itinerary

June 29 : Nairobi

Arrive in Nairobi any time and make your way to the joining point hotel. A brief departure meeting will be held in the hotel reception area on the evening of Day 1 of your program. Upon arrival look for information from your tour leader on the hotel bulletin board regarding the meeting time.

Take today to wander the streets of central Nairobi, taking in old colonial architecture and the brightly colored crowds to get a feel for Africa. The city’s best attraction is the National Museum, home to most of the great prehistoric finds made by the Leakey family in East Africa, from Ethiopia to the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania. It also has sections on wildlife, art, geology, local history and a snake park.

West of the city, the suburb of Karen is named after Karen Blixen, author of “Out of Africa”. Her house is now the Karen Blixen Museum, complete with a garden and tea house, it tells the history of the famous author. Also in Karen is the African Butterfly Research Institute , a large magical greenhouse alive with native butterflies.

South of Nairobi, in Langata, are a number of the city's best attractions. At the Giraffe Center, you'll have the option of hand-feeding the rare Rothschild giraffes, plus embarking upon a nature walk with 160 different species of birds. The Sheldrick Animal Orphanage cares for young, orphaned elephants. The Bomas of Kenya is a living open-air museum of the tribes of Kenya, including regular dance performances. The Nairobi National Park is just south of the city, and covers 114 sq km. It has over 400 bird species, populations of lions and leopards as well as one of the country’s few thriving populations of black rhino.

The name Nairobi is derived from the Masai word for cool waters. This is the name the Masai people gave to a water hole known as Ewaso Nyirobi. In modern times, the sprawling, cosmopolitan city of Nairobi combines the first-world glamour of reflecting-glass skyscraper buildings with abject developing-world poverty. It originated in 1899 from a handful of shacks that marked the end of the railhead during the building of the Uganda railway. Due to big game hunting bringing tourists from Britain, the city expanded dramatically in the early 1900’s. A large number of British nationals settled in the area, prompting more growth which angered both the Masai and Kikuyu people, as they were losing hunting ground due to the expansion of the city limits. The friction increased and, eventually led to the Mau Mau uprising, which saw Jomo Kenyatta, the future President jailed. Kenya was granted independence from Britain in 1963, with Nairobi as the capital.

Apart from being Kenya’s capital and the main center of government and commerce, Nairobi is the most significant city in East Africa and an important player on the pan-African political stage. It is the diplomatic base for many counties in Africa, with its broad spectrum of international embassies and headquarters for the United Nations, multi-national companies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and press correspondents. It’s also the center of the growing safari business of East Africa.

June 30 : Nakuru (B,L,D)

Descend into the Great Rift Valley enjoying stunning views of the escarpment on the way, arriving in time for lunch. Lake Nakuru is a shallow soda lake, renowned for its huge concentration of flamingos and over 460 species of birds. After setting up camp, embark on an afternoon safari within Lake Nakuru National Park, a beautiful environment of woodlands and grasslands, in search of the resident black and white rhino, buffalo, impala, and the elusive leopard.

Kenya's fourth largest town and the capital of the Rift Valley province, Nakuru, meaning “dusty place” in the Masai language, is a cheerful and vibrant agricultural town with a variety of colorful local markets. We camp outside of the town itself, at the edge of Lake Nakuru National Park, the area’s principal highlight and best natural attraction.

Lake Nakuru National Park began in 1961 as a small protected territory, only encompassing the famous lake of the same name, and the surrounding mountainous vicinity. Now it has been extended to include a large part of the area’s grassland savannahs and woodland slopes, and covers an area of roughly 116 square miles.

Lake Nakuru itself is one of the Rift Valley soda lakes. The alkaline lake's abundance of algae attracts the large quantity of flamingos, estimated into the millions which famously line the shore. The surface of the shallow lake is often hardly recognizable due to the continually shifting mass of pink. There are two types of flamingo species: the Lesser flamingo can be distinguished by its deep red carmine bill and pink plumage unlike the greater flamingo, which has a bill with a black tip. But flamingos are not the only avian attraction; also present are two large fish-eating birds, pelicans and cormorants. The park is rich in other birdlife, including grebes, white winged black stilts, avocets, ducks, and in the European winter, the migrant waders.

The park has recently been enlarged partly to provide the sanctuary for the black rhino. This undertaking has necessitated a fence - to keep out poachers rather than to restrict the movement of wildlife. The park now has more than 25 rhinos, one of the largest concentrations in the country, so the chances of spotting these survivors are better than in other parks. There are also a number of Rothschild's giraffe, again translocated for safety from western Kenya beginning in 1977. Numerous other mammals can be seen, including zebra, impala, gazelle, waterbuck, lion, warthog, bushbuck, many buffalo, and even at times, leopard.

July 1 to July 2: Masai Mara Game Reserve (2B,2L,2D)

After breakfast, we depart for the world famous Masai Mara Game Reserve. With its vast open plains and distinctive flat-topped acacia trees, no visit to Kenya would be complete without a visit here! In the afternoon we will arrive in the area, and get settled at our permanent tented camp, our base for our time here. Then we make our way into the reserve for an afternoon game viewing drive, with excellent chances of seeing the "Big 5" - lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant and rhino.

Day 4 starts with an early morning game drive, since the best time to spot wildlife is in the early hours of the morning. The day continues with more game viewing as you criss-cross the rolling hills of the African savannah. You will also have a chance to try the optional balloon safari, in addition to visiting a Masai village to learn about, and interact with, the local Masai people.

The Masai Mara (also spelled Maasai Mara) is a game reserve in south-western Kenya, which is effectively the northern continuation of the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. Named for the Masai tribes people, who are the traditional inhabitants of the area, and the Mara River, which divides it, the reserve is famous for its exceptional population of game and the annual migration of the wildebeest every September and October, a migration so immense it's called the Great Migration. Thousands of wildebeest die in the crossing due to crocodile attacks. The Great Migration is one of the most impressive natural events worldwide, involving an immensity of herbivores: some 1,300,000 wildebeest, 360,000 Thomson's gazelle, and 191,000 zebra.

With an area of 938 square miles, the Masai Mara is not the largest game park or reserve in Kenya, but it is probably the most famous. The entire area of the park is nestled within the enormous Great Rift Valley that extends from the Mediterranean Sea to Mozambique. The terrain of the reserve is primarily open grassland, with clusters of the distinctive acacia tree in the south-east region. The western border is the Esoit Oloololo Escarpment of the Rift Valley, and wildlife tends to be most concentrated here as the swampy ground means that access to water is always good. The easternmost border is 140 miles from Nairobi.

The Masai Mara is perhaps most famous for its lions, though the other members of the "Big Five" (lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant, and rhinoceros) are found there as well. That said, the population of black rhinoceros is severely threatened, with a population of only 37 recorded in 2000. Hippopotami are found in large groups in the Masai Mara and Talek Rivers, and many cheetah, zebra, impala, gazelles, hartebeest, warthog, ostrich, topi, the Masai giraffe, among other mammals, all consider the “Mara” their home territory. As well, the large Roan antelope and the nocturnal bat-eared fox, rarely present elsewhere in Kenya, can be seen within the reserve borders. Like in the Serengeti in Tanzania, the wildebeest are the dominant inhabitant of the Masai Mara, and their numbers are estimated in the millions. Around July of each year these animals migrate in a vast ensemble north from the Serengeti plains in search of fresh pasture, and return to the south around October. These numerous migrants are followed along their annual, circular route by a block of hungry predators, most notably lions and hyena.

The Masai Mara is a also major research center for the spotted hyena. Additionally, over 450 species of birdlife have been identified in the park, including vulture, marabou, secretary bird, hornbill, crowned crane, ostrich, long-crested eagle, and pygmy falcon.

July 3 : Lake Victoria (B,L,D)

After a morning traverse across the Mara plain, we cross into Tanzania at Isebania and camp just outside Serengeti National Park within easy reach of Lake Victoria. Take a guided walk or an excursion to Speke Bay, or go birding on its shores.

Lake Victoria is the world's second largest freshwater lake covering an area of 42,160 sq miles. This vast expanse, about the size of the state of Virginia, forms the headwaters of the Nile River. Three nations share the waters of the lake - Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, and Kenya's share is the smallest.

There is a busy network of waterways between the trading towns and villages which lie along the shores of the lake. Passenger boats and small cargo vessels ply daily from Kisumu in Kenya as far as the Tanzanian border and north to Port Victoria near Uganda.

Speke Bay is part of Speke Gulf, named after the famous explorer John Hanning Speke, who, in 1858, was the first Westerner to determine that Lake Victoria is the source of the Nile.

July 4 to July 5: Serengeti National Park (2B,2L,2D)

Venture to the world famous Serengeti National Park, one of Africa's premier game parks. The park is to Tanzania what the Masai Mara Game Reserve is to Kenya, though with an area of 9,173 sq miles, it is actually over 7 times larger!

We enter from the less-visited western gate, and enjoy the multitude of animal and bird life while cruising through the acacia-spotted savannah en route to the central Seronera plains. On day 7, after an early rise we enjoy an early morning game drive, returning to camp for a hearty lunch followed by a brief but well-deserved rest. Later on in the afternoon, as the animal kingdom comes alive, continue your search for the "Big 5" - lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant and rhino - while taking in the vastness of the Serengeti plains.

The Serengeti, which derives its name from the Masai word for “endless plain”, is the jewel of Tanzania’s protected areas, together with the Masai Mara and the Ngorongoro Conservation area it protects one of the most varied and greatest collection of wildlife on earth. With the Big Five, the Small Five and the extensive amounts of wildlife, this region offers arguably the best wildlife viewing opportunities in the world. That said, with its vast size and varied terrain, game viewing is only one aspect of the Serengeti - the scenery is simply breathtaking.

The Masai people arrived into the Serengeti plains in the 17th century, displacing the Datoga pastoralists who had previously lived there. They lived an undisturbed, nomadic life in the region for hundreds of years, until the first Westerner, an American, Stewart Edward White, passed through in 1913. He recorded the plains in the chronicles of a journey that began in Nairobi, Kenya. What he wrote still applies today: “... We walked for miles over burnt out country... Then I saw the green trees of the river, walked 2 miles more and found myself in paradise.”

There is no bad time to visit the Serengeti as every season has its own special highlight – even the rainy season has the daily thunder and lightening to look forward to. Changing seasons and light patterns form the most beautiful backdrop to view Africa’s majestic and incredible wildlife. It has more than 1.6 million herbivores and thousands of predators. Blue wildebeests, gazelles, zebras and buffalos are the animals most commonly found in the region.

This area is most famous for the migration that takes place every year; in October over a million herbivores travel toward the southern plains, crossing the Mara River from the hills to the north. They continue west across the Serengeti, and then north once again, crossing the Mara River, after the rains around April, and often totals more than 800km. This phenomenon is sometimes also called the Circular Migration. Over 250,000 wildebeest alone will die along the journey from Tanzania to Masai Mara Reserve in Kenya.

Note: You will have the opportunity to go on an optional Serengeti balloon safari early on the morning of day 7.

July 6 : Olduvai Gorge/Ngorongoro Conservation Area (B,L,D)

Break camp and take in the active morning wildlife as you cross the Serengeti plains and journey to the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, famous for Africa's best game viewing. Stop at the archaeological site of Olduvai Gorge, before arriving at your camp late in the afternoon. The views from the Ngorongoro Crater rim are stunning, and there is an ever-present abundance of wildlife, due to the permanent water supply on the crater floor.

The Olduvai, or Oldupai, Gorge is commonly referred to as “The Cradle of Mankind”. It is a deep, steep ravine that is roughly 48 km long. It is famed for the discovery of the 3.5 million year-old fossil fragments of an early human civilization. Accordingly, it is one of the most important prehistoric sites in the world and has been instrumental in furthering understanding of early human evolution.

The 8,300 km² Ngorongoro Conservation Area is named after its central feature, the Ngorongoro Crater, the world’s largest intact volcanic caldera, and arguably its most spectacular natural arena. Ngorongoro Crater has often been described as one of the wonders of the world, not only because of its inherent geological significance, but also because it serves a quite extraordinary natural sanctuary for some of Africa’s most dense population of large mammals. The Ngorongoro was part of the original Serengeti National Park proclaimed in 1951, but it was made a separate conservation area in 1956 so that the Masai could graze their cattle there. The Ngorongoro Crater became a World Heritage Site in 1978.

Land in the conservation area is unique to Tanzania as it provides protection for the wildlife whilst allowing human habitation. The landscape is made up of a blend of volcanoes, grasslands, waterfalls and mountain forests where the wildlife is extensive. The southern and eastern boundaries are approximately defined by the rim of the Great Rift Valley, which also prevents animal migration in these directions. The annual ungulate migration passes through the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, with wildebeest and zebra moving south into the area in December and moving north in June. The area has healthy resident populations of most species of wildlife.

July 7 : Ngorongoro Crater/Arusha (B,L,D)

After breakfast we embark on a half-day crater tour. The rich pasture and permanent water of the Crater floor supports a resident population of more than 20,000 to 25,000 large mammals. They are not confined by the crater walls, and can leave freely; they stay because conditions are favorable. Since most of the crater floor is grassland, grazing animals predominate: zebra, gazelles, buffalo, eland, and warthogs. The swamp and forest provide additional resources for hippos, some of Tanzania's last remaining black rhinos, giant-tusked elephants, waterbucks, reedbucks and bushbucks, baboons and vervet monkeys. All these animals in turn support large predators such as lion and leopard, and scavengers such as hyena and jackals.

After this fabulous experience within the crater, we have to leave the wildlife behind us and start heading back to Arusha, where you can enjoy the last safari evening with your travel companions and experience a truly unique "local dinner” in the private home of a local family in Arusha.

Arusha, also known as Tanzania’s “safari capital,” has many protected national parks, reserves, and mountains nearby (on a clear day, it may be possible to see Mt. Kilimanjaro in the distance). Arusha is a modern town, and with its markets, services, and fine location, it is a great base for your safari trip.

Arusha officially became a city on the 1st of July 2006. The primary industry of the region is agriculture with large vegetable producers sending high-quality produce to Europe. The city and its environs are also spotted with large coffee plantations, adding to the area’s charm. Though in recent years, due to the coffee crisis, many local farmers have been badly hit, and now subsistence farming is the most common source of livelihood.

Arusha owes its name from the local Wa-arusha people who resided here for hundreds of years, and is historically and politically significant city within East Africa. In 1961 the official documents ceding independence to Tanzania were signed by the United Kingdom in Arusha. Six years later the Arusha Declaration of Self Reliance in Tanzania was signed. On the 4th of August 1993 the Arusha Accords were signed by representatives of competing factions in the civil war in neighboring Rwanda. After the Rwandan genocide, the UN Security Council decided by its Resolution 955 of 8 November 1994 that Arusha should host the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The establishment of the tribunal has influenced the local economy of Arusha.

July 8 : Arusha (B)

Depart Arusha at any time.

Stuff You Need to Know

Terms and Conditions

It is very important for you to visit our Terms and Conditions page before signing up for this program.

Trip Notes

VERY IMPORTANT: This is a camping trip!

Service Level

Basic:

Our Basic service level is for trips that are slightly more rustic than the normal service level. Our basic, accommodation is clean and well kept. For some of our our basic trips camping is involved. Others might have have the occasional multi-share accommodation. When it comes to getting around, public transport is often the best and most colourful way to go. Alternatively, travel is by private van or coach. Ideal for travellers looking to combine the convenience of small group travel at a competitive price.

Physical Grading

2:

2: Light walking and hiking that is suitable for most fitness levels.

Minimum/Maximum Group Size

This program requires a minimum of 6 participants to run and will have a maximum of 14 participants.

Group Leader Description

All GEEO/G Adventures group trips are accompanied by one of G Adventure's group leaders, which they refer to as Chief Experience Officers (CEO). For this program you will also be joined by 2 different teams of expert driver/guides and camp cooks, one in Kenya and one in Tanzania. The Chief Experience Officer (CEO) will be the group manager and leader. He/she organizes the trip, and will be there to assist you when needed. Your leader may be from East Africa, or another country outside of the region, and will have a general knowledge base of the region and wildlife. He/she will take care of the small things so you can concentrate on enjoying your adventure. Your driver/guides are skilled and experienced drivers and a certified safari guides, and are an integral part of the team. As well, cooks will prepare the camp meals to add some further local flavor to the trip.

Packing List

You will be on the move a lot, so our advice is to pack as lightly as possible. Your baggage should be clearly labelled and restricted to one soft compact suitcase, sports bag, or backpack, no larger than 30cm(height) x 30cm(width) x 60cm(length), maximum 15kg, plus a daypack. Luggage limits on airlines are strictly enforced, and due to limited vehicle capacity, the cost of transporting any luggage beyond these restrictions is the responsibility of the client. Please note, if you are travelling with a large amount of luggage and will be returning to Nairobi later in your trip, you may leave a portion of it at the start hotel, this is indeed possible as storage facilities are available.

It is important to pack clothes for warm days and cool evenings, as well as a warm jacket for early morning game drives. Light, quick-drying, practical clothes are advisable for this safari trip. A set of smart casual clothes is also advisable for your time in Nairobi and Arusha.

Suggested Checklist

-Fleece or wool jumper/jacket
-Windproof/waterproof jacket
-Small towel and swimwear
-4 shirts/t-shirts, cool and breathable
-Long-sleeved shirt or sweater for evenings
-1 pair of shorts
-2 pairs of long trousers
-1 pair hiking pants/track pants
-Comfortable shoes
-Winter hat/Warm hat
-Warm sleeping bag
-small travel pillow
-Sport sandals
-Sun hat, Bandana
-Sunblock
-Sunglasses
-Watch or alarm clock
-Water bottle
-Purification tablets or filter (bottled water is also available for purchase)
-Pocketknife
-Flashlight or Headlamp (with extra batteries and bulbs)
-Money belt
-First-aid kit (should contain Lip balm with sunscreen, Aspirin, Ibuprofin , Malaria pills, bandaids/plasters, tape, anti-histamine, Antiseptic cream, Imodium or similar tablets for mild cases of diarrhoea, rehydration powder, insect repellent, extra prescription drugs you may be taking)
-Toiletries (biodegradable)
-Hand sanitizer gel/Sanitizer wipes
-Toilet paper
-Camera and extra memory card/film
-Extra batteries (recommended)
-Electricity Plug Adapter

Optional Checklist

Optional Items: Camera and film, reading/writing material, binoculars, cover for backpacks, purification tablets or filter, pocketknife.

Document Checklist

-Passport (with photocopies)
-Travel insurance (with photocopies)
-Yellow fever certificate
-Airline tickets (with photocopies)
-USD cash and traveller's cheques
-Credit or debit card (see personal spending money)
-G Adventures vouchers, pre-departure information and Trip Details
-Any entry visas or vaccination certificates required

Laundry

Hand washing of clothes can be done at campsites, as most have simple facilities for this. We recommend you bring a non polluting/biodegradable soap, as well as a roll of simple string to act as a drying line for your clothes. If you arrive in the late afternoon, or if there is poor weather, it may not be possible for your clothes to completely dry. Your start/end hotels also have laundry service for a fee.

Single Travellers

We believe single travelers should not have to pay more to travel so our trips are designed for shared accommodation. Single travelers joining group trips are paired in a tent with someone of the same sex for the duration of the trip.

Money

Spending Money

Every traveler is different and therefore spending requirements will vary. Some travelers may drink more than others while other travelers like to purchase more souvenirs than most. Please consider your own spending habits when it comes to allowing for drinks, shopping and tipping. Please also remember the following specific recommendations when planning your trip.

Money Exchange

The local currency in Kenya is the Kenyan Shilling (KES, or KSH)., and in Tanzania is the Tanzanian Shilling (TSH). The easiest foreign currency to exchange for locally into either Kenyan or Tanzanian Shilling is the $US, however the British Pound and Euro are also widely exchanged as well. Large denomination notes attract the best exchange rates ($US 50, $100). $US notes that are older than year 2000 are not accepted everywhere and can be very difficult to change. In addition, $US notes prior to 1996 are worthless in East Africa, as they are not accepted and impossible to exchange. Travelers’ cheques are also difficult to exchange in many places, especially in Tanzania, and often get a lower rate. Debit cards are very useful for cash advances, but you must remember to bring your PIN number (be aware that many ATM machines only accept 4-digit PINs.). The Visa/Plus system cards are the most widely accepted debit cards; it is harder to find machines that accept Cirrus cards.

While there are many ATMs in Nairobi, Kenya and in Arusha, Tanzania, there are no guarantees that your credit or debit cards will actually work in Africa. Check with your bank. Barclays Bank is known the have the ATMs that accept the most foreign bank cards. Credit cards can be used in major cities and towns ONLY but please do not rely on them as a method of payment because they are generally not widely accepted. You should be aware that to purchase products or services on a credit card a fee of 5%-10% usually applies. Do not rely on credit or debit cards as your only source of money. A combination of US dollar cash and cards is best, with travellers cheques being your last resort. Always take more rather than less, as you don't want to spoil the trip by constantly feeling short of funds.

In Nairobi, Kenya, there are money exchange kiosks, called Forex Bureau, or Bureau de Change, at the airport, at our starting hotel, and in downtown Nairobi on Muindi Mbingu street.

In Arusha, Tanzania, there are numerous Bureau de Change on Sokoine Road in the center of the city near to the Clock Tower, the city’s landmark.

As currency exchange rates can fluctuate often we ask that you refer to the following website for daily exchange rates: www.xe.com.

Medical Forms

GEEO travel programs bring together people of all ages. It is very important you are aware that, at minimum, an average level of fitness and mobility is required to undertake our easiest programs. Travelers must be able to walk without the aid of another person, climb 3-4 flights of stairs, step on and off small boats, and carry their own luggage. Travelers with a pre-existing medical condition are required to complete a short medical questionnaire, which must be signed by their physician. This is to ensure that travelers have the necessary fitness and mobility to comfortably complete their chosen trip. While our tour leaders work hard to ensure that all our travelers are catered for equally, it is not their responsibility to help individuals who cannot complete the day's activities unaided. Please refer to the physical ratings above for more information.

The medical questionnaire can be found online at: www.gadventures.com/medical-form.

Optional Activities

Please note: All optional activities are booked and paid for locally in the local currency. You do not have to decide in advance which activities you would like to sign up for. The prices listed are based on the latest information we have received from our participants and G Adventures. They are not guaranteed to be accurate. Please feel free to use them as a guide for budgeting your trip.

All prices are listed in US dollar amounts, per person, and are examples of the entrances fees charged - this does not include hiring transport to/from the destination. And the majority of the activities should be paid in local currency.

Nairobi

Bomas of Kenya $9
Giraffe Center $11
Karen Blixen Museum $12
Nairobi National Park $60
Nairobi Safari Walk, Animal Orphanage and Impala Sanctuary $20
National Archives F.O.C.
National Museum $10
Railway Museum $5
The Carnivore Restaurant $30 set meal

Masai Mara

Masai Mara balloon safari $500
Masai Village - $20 per person
Please note, the optional Masai village visited in the Masai Mara is not to everyone’s taste. The Masai have been known to use aggressive sales techniques to pressure tourists into buying trinkets. We do not endorse this activity as we feel this experience does not represent an authentic village, nor do we feel that the entrance fee represents good value. Proceed with caution!

Costs

Please keep in mind this trip is designed to give you the freedom to do whatever interests you. Make sure you look over all of the optional activities and keep in mind these additional costs when deciding whether you can afford this program. The prices below are in US dollars and are rough estimates so you can budget your trip.

Tour Company Fee

$2,899 USD

Non-Educator Fee

$100 USD (Educators do not have to pay this fee)

Optional Activities

$150 USD. If you want to go hot air ballooning you will have to budget more.

International Airfare from USA

Roughly $1200-2000 USD
If you require assistance in booking your international airfare we would be happy to assist you. Just email air@gadventures.com for more information. Also see our FAQ for flight advice.

Insurance

$35- $200 USD
Please note it is mandatory for all of our travellers to have Emergency Medical insurance that covers for both emergency evacuation and repatriation to the sum of $200,000USD. We also strongly recommend purchasing an all inclusive plan that covers cancellation/interruption insurance as well.
See our FAQ for advice on Travel Insurance.

Tipping

$140 USD total. $55 USD for the G Adventures tour leader, $40 USD for the driver, $20 for Cook. Budget another $25 for tips on optional activities.

Meals Not Listed in the Itinerary

$45-60 USD

Laundry, Drinks, Phone Calls, etc.

You should budget for these types of expenses.

Airport and Departure Taxes

USD30, usually included in most international air tickets.

Vaccines

It all depends on what you don’t have already/what your insurance covers.

Visa

If you are American, $25 USD for Kenya, $100 USD for Tanzania

Souvenirs

$0-???? (This is up to you)

FAQ

What should be my expectations for this GEEO program?

Before you decide on travelling with GEEO it is important that you read all of the information about the program you are considering. To summarize, our programs are quite adventurous.

• You will be camping for a majority of this trip. Sometimes you will be pleasantly surprised with the facilities of the campsites, but we ask you to keep your expectations low.

• Sometimes you will have long days of transportation as this trip covers a lot of ground. The roads will often be an adventure in itself.

• You must be able to easily carry or roll your luggage, so do not over-pack. We recommend using a large backpack along with a smaller daypack, which is typically the most comfortable way to carry your possessions.

• Please make sure you have thoroughly read the itinerary and can handle the group activities.

• We recommend always carrying snacks with you because sometimes meals can be far apart.

• Please make sure you understand the role of your tour leader on this trip as they are not the traditional “guide” you may be expecting. While our trips are educational, they aren’t study/lecture trips. We want you to learn through exploring and much of your experience will be based on how active you choose to be in acquiring knowledge and interacting with locals.

• We try to set up anywhere from 1-3 school visits per program, but these sometimes fall through due to complications. Please understand they are not a guaranteed part of the program.

Hopefully this is the kind of adventure you are interested in!

Do I need a Passport? Do I need a visa?

All GEEO trips require that the participant have a valid passport that will not expire within 6 months of trip departure. If you have a U.S. passport, but it has expired, or will expire within 6 months of trip departure, click here for information on how to get it renewed. If you have never been issued a passport or have lost your passport, please click here. Processing time for US Passports is 4-6 weeks so please start this process immediately.

US passport holders do not need to get visas before arriving in Tanzania and Kenya. When you arrive at the airport in Kenya you will be required to pay $25 for a visa. When you arrive at the border with Tanzania you will be required to pay $100 for a Tanzanian Visa.

Non-American participants should check with their government to find out if they need a visa.

Where do I meet the group? What happens when I arrive at the airport?

Our groups meet at the hotel we use for the first night of the trip. Your tour leader will leave a note for you at the hotel's front desk with the introductory meeting time and location.

When you arrive at the airport you can either take a taxi ($20) to the first hotel or book an airport transfer. For an airport transfer you will be greeted at the airport by someone with a sign with your name on it. Some people find this comforting when getting off a long flight in an unfamiliar environment. Typically an airport transfer will cost about twice as much as a taxi would. If we have multiple participants on the same flight we can group those people together to share an airport transfer and save money. We cannot group people together if they are on different flights, even if those flights are scheduled to arrive within minutes of each other.

In May G Adventures will contact you to book both airport transfers and extra hotel nights.

Is it OK if I am traveling alone? Do I have to have a roommate?

Half of the people that travel with us are traveling by themselves so please don’t worry if you have no one who wants to join you on our trip. Our pricing is based on double occupancy, in other words, two people to a tent. If you do not have someone that you are traveling with that you would like to room with GEEO will find you a tent-mate of the same gender. You never have to pay for a single room unless you want one. If you want to room alone, there is a "My Own Room" fee for this trip of $1399.

What is group travel like?

As you travel on a group trip you will be exposed to all the pleasures and maybe some of the frustrations of travelling in a group. Your fellow travellers will probably come from all across the US and beyond and are likely to be of a variety of ages too. We ask you to be understanding of the various needs and preferences of your group - patience with your fellow travelers is sometimes required for the benefit of everyone's travel experience. Remember too that you have responsibilities to the group. If you are requested to be at a place at a certain time, ensure that you don't keep the rest of the group waiting. We have found time and time again that the very best trips we operate are those where the dynamics within the group work well - this takes just a little effort on your part.

Who travels with GEEO?

GEEO participants are mostly made up of American K-12 teachers. Each group tends to have a good mix of educators in their 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's and 60's. About half of our participants are coming alone and do not know anyone in the group prior to the trip. We group single travelers of the same gender together as tent-mates. If we have an odd amount of one gender we will rotate the single tent for free among the participants.

GEEO trips are open to all Kindergarten to University teachers, school staff, school administrators, and soon-to-be teachers pursuing their teaching certificate. Our programs are also open to retired educators. Non-American educators are welcome on our trips.

Participants in our programs are permitted to bring friends or family members on their trip. You must be at least 18 years old to participate and of adequate fitness level for your chosen trip.

How long have we been running this program?

GEEO was founded in 2007 and our inaugural trips were run to Peru and India in the summer of 2008. 2013 will be the first time we run this program in Kenya and Tanzania. G Adventures, who actually handle the logistics of the trip have been running trips to Eastern Africa for many years so you can have faith that your trip will be safe and well run.

Is it possible to get references for GEEO?

Over 500 educators have traveled with GEEO since we ran our first programs in 2008. We have had an overwhelmingly positive response to the quality and value of the life changing experiences that we provide.

To read comments from past travelers, please feel free to visit a website that reviews non-profit organizations called Great Non-profits. Please click here for those reviews.

Please contact us if you would like to communicate with some of our former participants for a reference.

What cities/airports should I book my flight in and out of?

Your trip begins in Nairobi and ends in Arusha. Please double check our itinerary for the date on which you must arrive in Nairobi by. You can arrive at anytime of the day you choose. You can depart anytime on the final day of the trip.

This tour ends on day 10. You are free to depart any time this day.

Kilimanjaro International Airport is approximately 40km and 40 minutes from Arusha. A taxi is 50-60 USD per car, but we recommend that you contact your airline in Arusha, as some airlines may have a free airport shuttle from Arusha.day.

If you are returning to Nairobi, Kenya, there is a public shuttle bus that leaves Arusha at 8:00am and 14:00pm daily to Nairobi. It is a direct bus, and with border formalities, the trip usually takes 6 hours. There are a number of local companies that offer this service, and this can be organized locally the same day. These buses currently depart from the Bella Luna Hotel parking areas. In addition, for your convenience, you may pre-reserve a seat on our partner shuttle service through G Adventures.

Where can I purchase flights?

We recommend using www.kayak.com to see what is out there in terms of flights. G Adventures also has a wonderful air department, which can be reached at 1-800-708-7761.

You may also want to take a look at the prices at www.flyforgood.com or call 1-877-359-4466 to speak to a person. They get humanitarian rates from airlines and GEEO is registered with Fly for Good as a non-profit. If you purchase a humanitarian rate flight, you will need a supporting document from GEEO. Please request this from us after you purchase the tickets. Note that humanitarian rates are not available for all flights to GEEO destinations, and are sometimes higher than tickets found on on kayak, travelocity, orbitz, etc. Often the layovers are long and sometimes impossible to navigate. Look very carefully at the offer before purchasing your ticket.

When should I purchase my flights?

You must wait until this trip is confirmed with the minimum amount of required participants before you book your flights. Typically we have the minimum amount needed by the end of April. GEEO and G Adventures bear no responsibility for any flights purchased before the trip is confirmed.

Where can I purchase travel insurance?

One of the least expensive options is the "International Volunteer Card." They have a $35 card (The individual plus option) that includes the amount of travel medical, evacuation and repatriation insurance you need for our trip, plus other trip insurance benefits.

To sign up for the card you can follow this link:

http://www.volunteercard.com/.

We recommend purchasing cancellation insurance too, which the IVC offers as an additional option.

Another option is www.insuremytrip.com. They offer different options from many different companies. You can also get your insurance directly through G Adventures if you wish.

Please note it is mandatory for all of our travelers to have Emergency Medical insurance that covers both emergency evacuation and repatriation to the sum of $200,000USD.

Can GEEO book extra hotel nights for me?

You may want to stay longer in Nairobi or Arusha so feel free to arrive a few days early or depart a few days later. We can book your extra hostel nights for you if you wish.

In May we will contact you to see if you would like to book extra hotel nights.

What are the emergency contact numbers for this trip?

Should you need to contact G Adventures during a situation of dire need, it is best to first call our local office. If for any reason you do not receive an immediate answer, please leave a detailed message and contact information, so they may return your call and assist you as soon as possible. G Adventures Emergency Mobile Phone for our Local Office in Nairobi, Kenya: +254 727 208 832. Locally, from Kenya, dial 0727 208 832. Beyond that, you may try our Operations department in Canada:

Toll-free, North America only: 1 800 465 5600.
Calls from UK: 0844 410 1030
Calls from Australia: 1 300 796 618
Outside North America, Australia and the UK: +1 416 260 0999

For any issues relating to pre booked transfers for Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Airport including delays or missed transfers, please contact our airport transfer operator (Patrick) on +254 722 874 566.

Is there any safety advice we should know about?

Many national governments provide a regularly updated advice service on safety issues involved with international travel. We recommend that you check your government's advice for their latest travel information before departure. We strongly recommend the use of a neck wallet or money belt while travelling, for the safe keeping of your passport, air tickets, travellers' cheques, cash and other valuable items. Leave your valuable jewellery at home - you won't need it while travelling. Many of the hotels we use have safety deposit boxes, which is the most secure way of storing your valuables. A lock is recommended for securing your luggage. When travelling on a group trip, please note that your tour leader has the authority to amend or cancel any part of the trip itinerary if it is deemed necessary due to safety concerns. Your tour leader will accompany you on all included activities. During your trip you will have some free time to pursue your own interests, relax and take it easy or explore at your leisure. While your tour leader will assist you with options available in a given location please note that any optional activities you undertake are not part of your itinerary, and we offer no representations about the safety of the activity or the standard of the operators running them. Please use your own good judgment when selecting an activity in your free time. Although the cities visited on tour are generally safe during the day, there can be risks to wandering throughout any major city at night. It is our recommendation to stay in small groups and to take taxis to and from restaurants, or during night time excursions.

Protests and Demonstrations- Protests and demonstrations, even those that are well intended, have the potential to turn violent with no warning. Counter protests can also turn violent. Action by security forces to disperse demonstrators and protesters may occur at any time. If you are in an area where demonstrators or protesters are gathering, avoid the temptation of staying for a good photo opportunity and leave the area immediately.

Water based activities have an element of danger and excitement built into them. We recommend only participating in water based activities when accompanied by a guide(s). We make every reasonable effort to ensure the fun and adventurous element of any water based activities (in countries with varying degrees of operating standards) have a balanced approach to safety. It is G Adventure's policy not to allow our tour leaders to make arrangements on your behalf for water based activities that are not accompanied by guide(s).

Swimming, including snorkeling, is always at your own risk.

PHOTOGRAPHY:
Please do not take photo’s of Police stations or at Cross borders, Airports, army barracks and personnel or any Government building. It is against the law and will result in the minimum of your film and camera being confiscated.

Nairobi
-Please don’t wander through the city at night. Stick to the main streets only during the day, and after sundown, please take a taxi. Taxis can be organised from reception of your hotel. Also, take the address of the hotel with you.
-People are generally friendly, but don’t let people take advantage of you, especially the sales people!
-Beware of people approaching you on the street with an apparent interest of where you are from, and want to sit down and have a chat with you. These people are con men and will ask you for money.
-People on the street who ask you if you want a safari and have a brochure are often con men, best to avoid these folk. Besides, you’re already on safari!

Arusha
Many of the above precautions should, also, be taken in Arusha, however this town generally has a more relaxed and friendly vibe. But due to carrying 70% of the tourism in Tanzania, there are many beggars, street sellers and safari touts. These are best avoided by a polite but firm NO THANK YOU!

What vaccinations do I need for this trip?

We legally cannot give you any medical advice. It is very important to consult your doctor or a travel clinic about which vaccinations you will need for your trip. GEEO recommends contacting Passport Health, (http://www.passporthealthusa.com/) who have travel clinics throughout the US. Please take this seriously!

Do I need a yellow fever vaccination certificate?

That depends. A Yellow Fever certificate is required if you are traveling to Kenya from a Yellow Fever endemic country. These certificates are required not only for passengers coming from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission but also those who may have transited through such countries. Incoming passengers who do not have the Certificate and are required to have it will be vaccinated at the Airport if they wish to enter the country. The cost of the vaccination is 1,000 Kenyan Shillings.

Is there clothing that is considered inappropriate that I should not bring?

Kenya and Tanzania are pretty relaxed places and you can pretty much wear anything you would like, if ever in doubt always best to err on the side of modesty

What should I expect in terms of school visits?

GEEO tries to include anywhere from 1 to 3 school visits per program; however these visits are never a guaranteed part of our programming. School visits can be very tricky.

• In many of the countries we visit, schools will be closed for vacation over the summer. In that case we try to arrange an informal meeting with local teachers or a visit to a summer school.

• Many times we spend hours setting up a visit only for the school to cancel on us at the last minute.

• Often arranging school visits is easier if done in person with short notice. Your tour leader will try to schedule ad hoc school visits for your group when possible.

• Each school visit is different. We aim for you to get a tour of the school, sit in on a class and have a Q and A session with some of the staff.

• If we do schedule a school visit it is important that the entire group attend. In the past we have offended schools that were expecting ten visiting educators and only three came.

• Over time we try to establish long term relationships with schools so we can have more predictable, immersive visits that are rewarding for both our guests and the schools themselves.

Should I bring school supplies with me to donate to a school?

You can if you wish. Please keep in mind it is important for you to pack light for your trip and school supplies can take up a lot of space. Sometimes school visits are at the end of the trip so you may be carrying the supplies for the entire trip. Sometimes we aren't able to arrange a school visit at all so you would then have to figure out a way to give them out yourself.

Our advice is to bring some school supplies with you and if you need more, purchase them locally. This will allow you to give an appropriate gift, save room in your pack and also help the local economy. We encourage you to establish relationships with the schools that we visit. In the past some of our participants have run fundraisers for needy schools and have mailed supplies to the schools.

Do I need plugs and current converters for my electronic devices?

There are two components to provide external power to your device: adapters and transformers. The adapter is the plug, adapting the prongs on a standard U.S. three-pronged power cord to match the prongs required by the local outlets. The transformer changes the local voltage to that required by your computer.

Kenya uses a 240v type G plug, which has three square prongs and is the same one used in the United Kingdom. Tanzania uses 230v with both type D and type G plugs. The type D plug has two small round prongs and one wide round prong and is the same plug used for India.

Most laptops, ipod chargers, phone changers will be usable both on 120V and 220V. A universal pin adaptor will be needed to plug in US based devices to the local outlets. Check your device to see what voltage range it handles. Most transformer blocks will have an "Input" line that defines its voltage capacity. For example, "Input: 100 - 240V" means that it will work on voltages from 100V to 240V. If your transformer can't handle the different voltage, you'll need to purchase a voltage converter. You can find world regional voltage converters power packs at various vendors.

Is the water safe to drink?

Unless your tour leader tells you differently, only bottled water should be drunk, and this is readily available for purchase. Fruit and vegetables should be peeled, washed in boiled water and in the case of the latter, well cooked. Meat and fish should also be fresh, well-cooked and hot, to avoid possible infection.

Is there Internet access? Should I bring a computer? Mobile phone?

There are Internet cafes in most of the places we visit and many of the hotels also have computers that can be used. Expect to be able to check your email every two to three days. You can also bring along your mobile phone if you choose. Make sure you check with your phone company before you leave to find out the rates for calling back to the US and if they have any special international plans that are worth taking advantage of. International roaming rates can be extremely high, so you don’t want to be surprised. You can bring a laptop/netbook/tablet computer if you wish, but remember, GEEO and G Adventures are not responsible for the damage or theft of you valued items.

What is the weather like?

There are generally two rainy seasons - the short and the long rains. The short rains normally occur from late October through November, and the long rains from late March through to early June. A good time to visit is between late June and October when the rains have finished and the air is coolest. Alternatively, from late December to February or early March is another good time to visit, just after the short rains, but before the long rains; this is the warmest time of the year. The highest season for travellers into the region is in January and February, when the hot, dry weather is generally considered to be the most pleasant. During the rainy season it can be deceptively cold at times and evenings can be cool year round, so ensure you have adequate warm clothing such a a fleece or warm sweater.

Is the itinerary exactly as described on this website?

While it is our intention to adhere to the route described on our website, there is a certain amount of flexibility built into the itinerary and on occasion it may be necessary, or desirable to make alterations. The itinerary is brief, as we never know exactly where our journey will take us. Due to our style of travel and the regions we visit, travel can be unpredictable. The information on our website is a general guide to the tour and region and any mention of specific destinations or wildlife is by no means a guarantee that they will be visited or encountered.

Additionally, any travel times listed are approximations only and subject to vary due to local circumstances.

Why are some activities included in the price of the trip and others are not?

We have found paying locally for activities allows our participants to save money. Not every activity is appealing to everyone and we don't want you to pay for services you might not use. Perhaps you feel sick one day and would prefer to rest. This allows you to decide on the spot what you want to do each day with your free time and at the same time control your budget.

Do you have advice on tipping?

Tipping is an expected - though not compulsory and optional (up to the discretion of the group/guest) - component of your tour program and an expression of satisfaction with the persons who have assisted you on your tour. It is one of the most direct ways that you can have a positive economic impact within the African community. Although it may not be customary for you, it is of considerable significance to the people who will take care of you during your travels, as an important source of income for those in the tourism industry. Giving a tip should be a seen as a formal 'thank you', and the action should in no way be awkward. The best method of tipping someone that has served the whole group is to plan in advance, and not rush when it comes to saying goodbye. A suggestion would be for each group member to contribute anonymously by putting their tip into an envelope. This often works the best and the group as a whole should gather to present the gift to the recipient(s), offering their thanks and showing their appreciation. This method brings the action out into the open, allowing for a friendly and appreciative interaction between the group and the recipient(s).

Please note that you will be saying good-bye to your Kenya driver/guides and camp crew on Day 5, and the morning of this day is the best to put together a tip for this team.

You may use the following as a guideline, all given in a per client format: Chief Experience Officer: US$5-7 (full day); Certified Safari Guide/Driver: US$3-5 (full day); Camp Cook, Supply Driver US$2-3 (full day); Local guide (optional activities) $1 for a couple hours; Restaurant/Café servers: 10% of cost of bill, especially when in a large group (no envelope required).

What are the accommodation/camping like?

Camping in Kenya and Tanzania is truly an adventure. You will be able to get off the beaten track to get a first-hand experience of the beautiful wilderness and nature. While camping, we stay at designated campsites inside of and nearby the national reserves and parks. These campsites generally are very basic, and we carry tents to pitch at the public campsites.

In Kenya, while at Nakuru, there is electricity (thus mildly heated showers), and flush toilets. If raining tents will be pitched on concrete under a covered area. For these nights you will be camping in two person dome tents with foam mattresses. Alternatively while in Nakuru an upgrade to a simple room is possible for an extra cost. At the Masai Mara, we will stay in a simple permanent tented camp. These are walk-in “safari tents” with single beds & mattresses. There is no electricity for lights or charging batteries. The facilities here are basic, though there are flushing toilets and hot water when the boiler is working.

In Tanzania, we will stay at some very basic campsites. While at Lake Victoria, there are flush toilets, and hot showers when the generator is operating. Electricity for lights and charging batteries will also only be available when the generator is on. As at the Serengeti and Crater campsite, you will be staying in two person dome tents with foam mattresses. The campsite in the Serengeti will be the most basic of your tour. There is no electricity, no hot water for the showers, and the toilets are drop-style in nature. At the Crater camp, you will return to some of the comforts of home - hot showers, flush toilets, and electricity for charging your batteries.

Despite the challenge that a few days “roughing it” may pose to some, the experience of being that close to nature, camping under the African stars, and seeing incredible wildlife at your tent door-step is not just gratifying but ultimately an experience of a lifetime.

The idea of camping in Africa can be a daunting one, however on this program we provide full camping service. All tents are pitched for you, meals are prepared and served and the washing up is done by G Adventures staff. This leaves you with more time to enjoy your surroundings and is ideal for first-time campers who may be worried about the challenges such a trip can entail.

When camping we are exposed to the elements, and whilst there are times when the weather is fine and temperatures are pleasant, there may be days when it is foggy, rainy and cool. In certain locations there may also be a number of bugs. These factors, however, should be seen as minor downsides to a camping experience which will allow you to get up close to the beautiful nature that Africa has to offer.

All camping equipment (with the exception of your sleeping bag and pillow) is supplied. We supply canvas dome tents with built-in mesh insect nets on the doors and windows. Mattresses are also available, which are approximately 4cm thick, warm and comfortable. Please note drinking water, ice, and fire wood are not provided but can be bought locally with the assistance of the Chief Experience Officer.

Please note: Sleeping bags can not be rented on this program so you must bring your own!

What is the food like on this trip?

When an evening meal is not included, your hotel will have a restaurant or your will be advised of a good local establishment. All camp meals you have during your trip will be prepared from fresh local produce. Shopping for food will be done before the trip departs, fresh vegetables and fruit will be bought along the route from supermarkets, local shops and markets. Breakfasts will generally be cereals, if time allows a warm breakfast may be prepared. Many lunches will be provided en-route and will be light meals such as sandwiches or salads. All evening meals will be hot and will consist of a variety of continental and local dishes. Meals will be prepared by the crew with assistance from you if you would like to help cook, this is not compulsory. Vegetarian meals and other dietary requirements need to be specified prior to arrival. We do however ask you to wash your own dishes. Please note all bottled drinking water while on safari will be at your own expense.

Is there a lot of driving?

This is not a physically demanding journey; however, travelling can be difficult, as long drives and poor road conditions are the rule as opposed to the exception in both Kenya and Tanzania. A safari is about travelling to see animals, so we cover long distances crossing the country to visit different game parks. Once there, we spend the majority of the time viewing game while driving in the parks. This translates to a lot of driving. Despite this, the diversity and scenery of the African landscape, the local culture and abundant wildlife are all well worth the experience.

What is our transportation like?

This trip is done in private 7-seat 4x4 safari vans in Kenya and 5 or 7-seat 4x4 safari vehicles in Tanzania. You will change vehicles/drivers at the border on day 5. With sliding windows and a large pop-up roofs, these vehicles are designed for game viewing. If there is a large group, 2 vehicles will be used, and the group will be split up. Road conditions can run the full range of conditions from new to very poor. This style of travel is by no means luxurious, but the seats are comfortable and having our own private vehicles allow us the flexibility of making stops when needed, and to stay and watch that crouching lion prepare for an attack. If you are returning to Nairobi from Arusha at the end of your safari and have pre-booked your "shuttle" transfer through G Adventures, you will travel in a public shuttle; these are large mini buses with seating for 22-24 passengers.

Speed governors set to 80kph are used on all vehicles to ensure a safe driving speed. Please note for your own safety it is mandatory to wear your seat belt at all times when in a vehicle.

All G Adventure vehicles are regularly serviced and follow a strict maintenance schedule. However given the long travel days and rough conditions of many of the roads in Africa, vehicles can and do breakdown on occasion. If such situations occur all drivers are trained mechanics and any vehicle issues are rectified as quickly as possible so as to not disrupt your trip. Your patience is requested if the vehicle you are traveling in happens to encounter a mechanical fault.

How much money in US cash should I bring? Should I exchange local currency in advance?

This is entirely up to you, but we think it is critical for you to bring along $200 USD in cash for emergencies. This is what GEEO's executive director Jesse does in regards to money while traveling:

"I do not exchange any money before travelling to a country but instead bring somewhere between $300-500 US in cash. I go to a bank before I leave the US and take out the cash there rather than an ATM. I make sure each bill is in great condition with no rips or tears. I like to have mostly 20's, but in some countries you are better off with 50's and 100's. In some countries it is also good to have about 20 singles for when you have no small bills in local currency. I divide this money between a money belt and my main backpack and my daypack.

I also bring an ATM card and a credit card. Before I leave the country I call the bank and credit card companies to let them know I am traveling abroad so they don't think the foreign transactions are fraudulent and cancel my cards when I am most reliant on them. Having a second bank account and bank card is pretty handy so that just in case one card doesn't work at an ATM or is lost, you always have a back up account. It's also important to check with your credit card to see if there is an international transaction fee. Some cards charge up to 4% extra for any transactions made out of the US. My Capital One visa card doesn't have any international transaction fee. I just use this card for traveling so if it gets stolen and I have to cancel it I won't have to worry about recurring automated payments. I like to split up my cards between my money belt, wallet and one emergency one hidden in my main bag.

When I arrive at the airport I make sure to go to an ATM before leaving the airport and typically take out the equivalent of $150 USD in the local currency. I find that ATMs give the best exchange rate so throughout the trip I will use the ATM card to draw out my spending cash. I will ask our tour leader for an estimate on how much I will need if I am close to leaving a country so this way I do not draw out too much money.

I try not to use the US cash I brought with me so that I can use it in an emergency. Typically I will come back to the US with most of that US cash unspent. On a recent trip I lost my ATM card and was able to get cash by paying for our group dinners with my credit card and having people pay me their share in local currency. I NEVER take cash advances on my credit card as they charge you an arm and a leg.

I also never use travelers checks, but have heard good things about AAA ATM cards that you can load up with money instead of using travelers checks."

Are there mosquitoes? Should I be worried?

There are mosquitoes, and we recommend that you take preventative action against malaria. Using bug repellent is a very good idea, light weight long sleeve clothing at dusk and anti-malaria medication. The tents will be treated, there is no need for mosquito netting unless you plan to sleep outside your tent. Please consult your doctor for more information.

What is the migration like?

The Seronera Plains, which lie in the southeast of the National Park and extend into the western Ngorongoro Conservation Area, form the main ungulate calving grounds of the Serengeti. The wildebeest typically disperse into the Seronera plains during the short rains, which fall in late November or early December, before calving in January, and staying put until the end of the long rains from January to early May. Towards the end of April the wildebeest start to congregate on the southern plains in the preparation for the 800km northward migration. The major obstacle faced by the wildebeest on this migration is the crossing for the Grumeti River through the western corridor, which typically occurs from June into early July. From July to October, the ungulates disperse again, with about half of them crossing the Mara River into Kenya’s Masai Mara Game Reserve and the remainder spreading out through the northern and western Serengeti. By late October the animals have generally started to plod back southward to the Seronera Plains, to arrive there in late November when the cycle starts all over again.

Is there any advice for finding funding for this program?

The first thing we recommend you do is speak to your school's principal and/or professional development coordinator. They may know of grants that your school district or state offers. Often schools reimburse teachers for professional development expenses. You can also try contacting your school's PTA or professional organizations that you belong to.

We also recommend applying for a Fund for Teachers grant, www.fundforteachers.org. These grants can be used on GEEO trips. Please note that they are only offered to teachers in a limited number of pre-selected school districts around the country.

What is expected from me from an educational stand point?

Please take a look at the "Sharing your Adventure section of our website by clicking here.

What happens if GEEO doesn't reach the minimum number of participants needed for this trip?

Typically we reach the minimum number for our groups in the month of April. If we do not have the minimum number of participants needed we will re-price the trip for the amount of people signed up, adding on a surcharge. It will be up to each individual whether they still wish to travel with the group at the new rate. If they choose to withdraw from the program at that time they will be issued a full refund. If need be we will cancel a trip and issue the entire group a full refund. It is important that you do not book your flights before a group is confirmed! It is pretty rare for us to have to cancel trips.

What happens if it becomes unsafe to travel on this trip?

Your safety is our utmost priority and we will cancel a trip if we do not feel our participants will be safe. If GEEO or G Adventures cancels your trip we will issue a full refund of any payments you have made including the deposit. If YOU decide to cancel your trip you will have to abide by the rules of our terms and conditions.

What is the relationship between G Adventures and GEEO? Who is running this trip?

GEEO is an independent non-profit organization that helps teachers travel. GEEO negotiates with tour companies to get great deals for teachers. GEEO customizes these trips for teachers. GEEO provides educational materials to teachers before and after the trip to help bring the participating teacher's experience into the classroom. GEEO markets these programs to convince teachers to explore the world. For more about GEEO, please see our mission statement.

G Adventures is a tour company that GEEO has partnered with to run our trips. For over 20 years G Adventures has been sending hundreds of thousands of people abroad and today they are the largest adventure travel company in the world. They design the trips, provide expert tour leaders, ground logistics and work hard to make sure you have an excellent experience.

What should I do if my luggage doesn't make it to Nairobi?

It occasionally happens that luggage on international flights into Nairobi does not arrive, especially with, but not exclusive to, major airlines out of London-Heathrow or Schiphol (Amsterdam). Please be aware that this may happen, especially if you have a tight connection in either of these centers, are flying with different airlines with a connection, have a last minute flight change or re-route, or fly from or connect through another African center. Please be prepared and keep all important documentation and valuables on your person. As well we recommend a change of clothes in your hand luggage. If unfortunately this does happen, and your luggage does not arrive, you should be entitled to a limited initial compensation from your airline. In Nairobi, the arrival of lost luggage normally takes between 48 and 72 hours after the initial plane’s arrival. The airlines technically should be responsible to forward your luggage to you, to your hotel or elsewhere in Kenya. You may find that your tour will begin, and you still have not received your luggage. Considering that the customer service standards in Kenya are different from home, and that we find that the airlines are not always pro-active in helping luggage in its care be reunited with its owner, it is recommended that you purchase locally a few needed items, begin your tour, and hire someone locally to persist with the your airline to retrieve your luggage. Your tour leader or local representative will be able to help you organize this, and once your luggage is retrieved, it should be able to be forwarded to you – depending where you are. Please note that any costs that you may incur for luggage retrieval or sending luggage are not the responsibility of G Adventures, though we will always strive to assist you in any way possible. You should always keep all receipts and documentation, and contact your airline or insurance provider for reimbursement.

Is there anything i should i know if i happen to be flying through London's Heathrow Airport?

Please note that regardless of the rules in other airports, travellers flying from, or connecting in, London-Heathrow are currently only permitted one carry-on piece of luggage and one small personal bag (purse, laptop-size bag, briefcase) on board on flights to Nairobi. If you arrive to the security gate with 2 pieces, you will be forced to check-in one of them, which may result in complications noted above. This policy is in place as of the time of writing, though local rules and regulations may indeed change. It is thus advisable to contact your airline directly for the most up-to-date information.

2899.00 USD

*Based on Double Occupancy, International Airfare not included

Availability: +7

This program requires a minimum of 6 participants to run and will have a maximum of 14 participants.

What's Included

  • Entrances and game drives in Lake Nakuru National Park, Masai Mara Game Reserve, Serengeti National Park, and Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Olduvai Gorge visit, Lake Victoria visit, Traditional dinner in local community.

  • 9 Breakfasts, 8 Lunches, 8 Dinners. (Allow USD45-60 for meals and drinks (including bottled water) not included.)

  • Simple hotel (2 nts), permanent tented camp (2 nts), full service camping (5 nts).

  • 7-seat 4x4 safari vehicle(s), supply vehicle for equipment when necessary.

  • G Adventures Tour leader throughout, certified driver/guide, camp cook.

What's Not Included

  • International air

  • Incidentals

  • Insurance

  • Applicable visas

  • Airport Taxes

  • Tips or gratuities

  • Beverages

  • Meals not mentioned above

  • Optional Tours or optional admissions